Find More Family Time…. With Gaming?

One of the new year’s resolutions many of our fans mentioned was finding more time for family.  It’s always a struggle, isn’t it? Whether you’re working and your kids are in day care, you’re working from home, or you’re staying home with your kids — there seems to always be stuff to do. And as much as you’d like family to always come first, sometimes {more often than we’d like to admit} that sink of dirty dishes or a pile of laundry wins out over 20 minutes of play time with the kids. Or even a quick conversation and coffee with your spouse.

If your parenting overdrive is starting to rev up {that little “I can be a better parent and will radically change behaviors with my super parent powers}, click it off. Rather than grabbing a huge calendar and starting to ‘schedule’ family time, start with something seemingly less ‘structured.’ Simply change your mindset. Starting with computer/video games.

Gah. Say what? The people in ‘my generation’ who played computer games were considered geeks/nerds! Those games are just for ‘them’ and for kids.

Maybe not.

Many of us believe that computer games are ‘solo’ time. There are some who think of them as we time — and maybe we should reconsider gaming as ‘family time.’

ABC News recently ran an opinion piece by Scott Steinberg, a business consultant and tech parenting writing who is launching a new book/tv project called The Modern Parent’s Guide.

Here are a few key ideas from the article:

  • A recent study from the Education Development Center and the U.S. Congress-supported Ready To Learn (RTL) Initiative found that a curriculum that involved digital media such as video games could improve early literacy skills when coupled with strong parental and teacher involvement.
  • Carefully-designed studies have also shown that action video games can improve several aspects of brain activity, including multitasking.
  • Games with broad appeal that are easy to grasp can additionally help many families play together, and better bridge the gap between generations.
  • Many games today also emphasize the cooperative aspects of game play, in which two or more players need to work together in order to reach a common goal.
  • Video games can also have some very important effects on family relationships, and deserve to be thought of as something that can – and should – be played together.

At KneeBouncers, we believe strongly in the power of co-play. It doesn’t need to be hours of play, just fit some ‘we play’ in whenever you can. Like exercise, a few minutes here and a few minutes there will really add up and pay off.

So the next time you’re waiting for the spaghetti water to boil, sit down and play a video game with your child.

You may just be a gamer.

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One Comment to this article;

  1. G’Day! Kneebouncers,
    I just stumbled across this and, I am a mother of a 4 year old and my husband and I are looking for ideas on how to spend more quality family time together. We do game nights on occasion, but those get a little dull with preschool games and we do art projects together as a family on occasion as well. Do you do any thing else together while at home?
    Thx.

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